Victim Programs

HOW WE HELP

“Empowering Victims and Restoring Hope for a Brighter Tomorrow”

VICTIM PROGRAMS

Every victim of a crime in Alberta is protected under the Alberta Victims of Crime Act and the Canadian Victims Bill of Rights.  These Acts support and recognize the needs of victims and protects their rights throughout the criminal justice process.

 

For further information on these Acts:

Alberta Victims of Crime Act

Canadian Victims Bill of Rights

VICTIM IMPACT STATEMENT

A Victim Impact Statement provides victims a voice in the criminal justice system. A Victim Impact Statement is a written statement that describes how a crime has impacted a victims’ life.  This statement is considered by the court if  the accused is found guilty and is taken into account at the time of sentencing.  The impact can be physical, emotional or financial.

A Community Impact Statement gives your community a chance to tell the court how it has been affected by a crime.  A Community Impact Statement follows the same guidelines as Victim Impact Statements and are only heard if the accused is found guilty.

 

For more information and instructions on Victim Impact Statements see below links: 

Victim Impact Statement Form

Community Impact Statement Form

FINANCIAL BENEFITS

A victim of crime in Alberta can apply to the Financial Benefits Program, which offers a monetary benefit based on the injuries suffered from a crime.  You do not have to wait for a charge or a conviction to apply for financial benefits.

 

The program offers two applications:

Financial Benefits Injury Application

Death Benefits Application

RESTITUTION

Restitution is a way for an accused person who is found guilty to pay a victim loss of money, loss or damage to property, or any additional expenses that were incurred because of the crime.

A victim can request restitution in a number of circumstances, including:

  • Lost wages.
  • Replacing items that were lost because of a crime.
  • Repairing damage caused by crime.
  • Costs associated with counselling services required as a direct result of a crime.
  • Costs associated with restoring one’s identity and righting one’s credit history.

 
The victim must be able to accurately describe the losses, as well as provide information such as receipts, pay stubs, and cost estimates. The court must consider ordering restitution. If restitution is ordered, it is up to the victim to enforce the order.

If the court doesn’t order restitution, victims can sue the offender in civil court.

 

For more information on restitution and how to apply:

Restitution Application